Lexeme – Index

Language Form Meaning Grammar Note
Stub Culture Indo-European kid-1

The appurtenance of Arm. ul 'kid, young of the goat', connected by Meillet REArm. 10 (1930): 184f. and others (including Arm. amul 'infertile' < IE *n̥-pōlo-) with 'foal' words in Germanic, Albanian and Greek, is "rather doubtful because of the deviating meaning" (HKM). Semantically, πῶλος corresponds exactly with modern German Fohlen, Füllen, and cognates, e.g. Go. fula, ON foli , OHG folo < PGm. * fulan-, with the diminutive ON fyl [n.] < PGm. * ful-ja-, OHG fulīn [n.] < PGm. * ful-īna-. Con… Details
Stub proto-form *kō̆g(h )

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Proto-Germanic *gaitīna-

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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *men- 'small'

Ranko Matasović. "menno-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. March 4, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=16898 > Details
Proto-Celtic *menno-

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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *s(e)m-eh₂-, *sm̥-h₂-ó- 'year'

Arm. amlik (Georgian erk'emali 'a male sheep above one year of age; ram', attested twice in the 18th century, was borrowed from Arm. erkeam (Bible+) 'of two years of age' )
Hrach K. Martirosyan. "amik" in: Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. March 4, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=55 >
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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *steruh₁en-

DTB Details
Proto-Indo-European *steruh₁en-

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Stub Culture Indo-European PCelt. *mokku- 'pig'

"In the absence of any known IE cognates, this is a likely candidate for a loanword from some non-IE source" (RM).
Ranko Matasović. "mokku-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. March 12, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=16930 >
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Proto-Celtic *mokku-

"In the absence of any known IE cognates, this is a likely candidate for a loanword from some non-IE source" (RM). Details
Gaulish Moccos

A Theonym(?) / Note also OFrk. mucke 'sow', a loan from Gaulish. Details
Gaulish Cato-mocus

Celtic personal name figuring in an inscription in Arpas, Hungary Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *suH- 'pig'

PCelt. *sukko- 'pig' "Possibly loaned from a non-IE source, or < PIE *suH- 'pig'." (RM). "The suggestion that Old English hogg was borrowed < Old Welsh huch pig, swine (Welsh hwch , now only in sense ‘sow’) or its cognate Old Cornish hoch (Middle Cornish hoch) is unlikely on phonological grounds, unless the word showed alteration in form as a result of association with... the set of Old English weak masculine nouns [denoting] animals... with a stem-final geminated g in Old English which is no… Details
Proto-Italic *sūs

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Proto-Albanian *sū, *sūs

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Proto-Balto-Slavic *swiʔn-

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Proto-Indo-European *suH-iHn-

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Proto-Tocharian *suw-on

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Proto-Indo-European *suh-

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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *porḱo- 'young pig, piglet'

*porḱ-o-*porḱ-os . "One of the Indo-European words for 'pig(let)'. In view of the possible connection with Gr. πόρκος m. 'fishing-net' and Arm. ors 'hunt; catch; game' < *porḱ-o-, the word may have originally referred to the wild boar rather than the domesticated animal" (GK).
1.Michiel de Vaan. "porcus" in: Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. March 12, 2014; …
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