Lexeme – Index

Language Form Meaning Grammar Note
Old Irish scáilid

to let go

v Details
Proto-Indo-European *skep-

to cut, to split, to dig

v Details
Proto-Indo-European *skel-

to cut; to cut, to split

v Details
Lithuanian skeliù, skìlti, skélti

to split, to divide; to cleave, to strike fire

v Details
Portuguese argentar

to plate with silver

v Details
Sanskrit vrj-

to twist

v Details
Proto-Indo-European *slenk-

to creep

v Details
Proto-Indo-European *bher-

to swell

v Details
Latin serpere

to crawl, to glide

v Details
Proto-Indo-European *serp-e/o-

to creep

v Details
Classical Greek hérpōἕρπω

to crawl, slink, go on all fours

v "Identical with Skt. sárpati 'crawl', Lat. serpō 'id.'. Several languages have derived the name of the snake from this root: Skt. sarpá- m., Lat. serpens, Alb. gjarpër" (RB) Details
Sanskrit sárpati

to creep, crawl

v Identical with ἕρπω v. ‘to crawl, slink, go on all fours’, Lat. serpere v. 'to crawl, to glide'. "Several languages have derived the name of the snake from this root". (RB) Details
English worry

worry, seize/kill with the teeth

(Especially of dogs or wolves attacking sheep) to seize by the throat with the teeth and tear or lacerate; to kill or injure by biting and shaking
v Details
Middle English wery, worowe

to strangle, to suffocate; to kill (a person or animal) by compressing the throat

v Details
Middle Low German worgen

to strangle

v Details
Dutch worgen, wurgen

to strangle, throttle

v Details
Middle High German erwergen

to strangle

v Details
Proto-Germanic *wergan-

to strangle

v Details
Old High German wurgen

to strangle; to worry, to kill by violence

v Details
Proto-Indo-European *uérǵh-e-

to strangle

v Details

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