Lexeme – Index

Language Form Meaning Grammar Note
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *uerǵ-o- 'work, act'

ON. verk n. 'labour, work, act' < PGm. *werka- n. ‘labour, work, act’ < PIE. *uerǵ-o-
Guus Kroonen. "werka- 1" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 18, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=23028 >
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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *pel- 'to skin; hide'

1. PCelt. *fletro- 'hide, leather' < PIE *pel- v. 'to skin' (RM). 2. PGm. *leþra- n. 'leather' <- PCelt. *φlitro- < PIE *pl-tro- (GK). “The Germanic words for 'leather' are prehistoric loanwords from Celtic. The Celtic forms presuppose the zero-grade of the PIE root (*pl-etro-), with the unusual form of the suffix *-etro- (rather than *-tro-), cf. Ru. plená < *pl-en-eh₂.” (RM).
1. Ranko Matasović. "fletro-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries …
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Occitan coir

leather

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Stub Culture Indo-European leather-2

Alb. lëkurë f. 'skin, hide; leather'
AED
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Old Church Slavonic jazьno, (j)azno

skin, leather

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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *der- v. 'to flay'

Gr. δέρμα n. '(slayed) skin, leather' < δέρω v. ‘to skin, flay’ < IE *der- 'flay'
Robert Beekes (with the assistance of Lucien van Beek). "δέρω" in: Etymological Dictionary of Greek. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2015. Brill Online. February 21, 2015. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl.ludwig.lub.lu.se/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=4766 >
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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *nāk-no-

IEW Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *h₁eu- 'put on (of clothes, shoes)'

DTB Details
Stub Culture Indo-European leather-1

MoGr. πετσί n. 'skin, leather' connected with Gaul. *pettia 'part, piece (?)'
CDB
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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *kr-io-, *k(o)r-io- v. 'torn off'

1. Lat. corium n. ‘leather; skin, animal hide’ < PItal. *korjo- < PIE. *kr-io-, *k(o)r-io- v. 'torn off' 2. PSl. *korà f. ‘bark’ < PIE. *(s)kor-
1. Michiel de Vaan. "corium" in: Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2015. Brill Online. February 20, 2015. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl.ludwig.lub.lu.se/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=13005 > 2. Rick Derksen. "skorà (skòra)" in: Etymological…
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Gaulish Alesia, Alisia

Toponym Details
Medieval Latin falisia

rock

Medieval Latin, attested 10th century. Compare OFr. faleise 'rocky escarpment, precipice' <- ON. fell, fjall n. 'mountain' < PGm. *falisa, *falisia 'rock', first attested 1155. Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *bhes- v. 'to rub (in pieces)'

Hitt. paššila-, connected with Skt. bhásman- 'ash' and Gr. ψῆφος 'pebble' from *bhes- v. 'to rub (in pieces)'.
AK
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Stub Culture Indo-European PCelt. *magino- ‘stone, place’

PCelt. *magino- ‘stone, place’. The attribution in IEW (709) to the root *meǵh₂- 'great' is possible, cf. Skt. mahī́- 'earth' (< *'the great one') and PCelt. *magos 'field', which might also be related. In this connection, it is interesting to note that W maen specifally means a stone 'having some speciality or a particular use', according to GPC. The OIr. form in -ā is a collective built from *magino-, like Lat. loca from locus.
Ranko Matasović. "magino-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-…
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Stub Culture Indo-European stone-10

PGm. *hargu- m. ‘sacrificial mound?’ < proto-form. *kark-ú-. Note also Finnish karkko, karkku 'pile, stone wall, cliff'. OW creic, W craig f. 'rock' < * krakyā-; Vann. krah 'hillock' < * krakkā-; less certain: OIr. carrac f. 'rock', OW carrecc, W carreg f. 'stone, rock' < * krs-Vk-ā-(?) and OIr. carn n. 'heap of stones', W carn m./f. 'id.' < * krn-(?). // // Etymology: “Outside Germanic, there are some similar formations in Celtic... but none of these forms can be reconciled with the Germanic… Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *pel- 'stone'

Proto-Indo-European *phels-/*phols-/*phḷs- 'stone' (AB): 1. PGm. *felsa, *felesa- m. ‘mountain’ < proto-form. *pe/ol-es-o- (GK). ON fell, fjall poins to *fel(V)sa- (with assimilation of the s and breaking of -e- to -ja-), but the WGm. attestations can go back to both *felesa- or *falisa-. The latter form is supported by OFr. falise, Fr. falaise, faloise. OFr. falise, Fr. falaise, faloise < OFr. *falisa-, “a Franconian loanword” according to GK, but Norman according to TLF. // 2. PCelt. *fales-… Details
Stub Culture Indo-European stone-6

AED Details
Stub Culture Indo-European stone-7

Pl. głaz m. 'stone, boulder'. Possibly connected with PIE *k'(e)l- 'rock, stone', or with PIE *gel- v. 'to form into a ball' (Pokorney, de Vries).
AB
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Middle Low German stēnrotse

Compound: stēn 'stone' & rotse 'rock'; compare OE stānrocc 'rock formation; cliff, crag, etc.' Details
Stub Culture Indo-European stone-5

PCelt. *glendos- ‘valley, shore’ < PIE. *glend- 'shore'. “Clearly limited to Celtic and Germanic, this word could have been borrowed from some non-IE language of NW Europe.” (RM) // OIr. glend [s n] (DIL glenn) MW glynn (GPC glyn) [m] 'glen, valley' MBret. glann 'shore' Co. glan // MLG klint, 'shore' ON klettr 'rock'
"glendos-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic, edited by: Ranko Matasovi?, Ph.D. (1995). Consulted online on 05/10/2017 <http://dictionaries.brillonline.com.ludwig.lub.lu.…
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