Lexeme – Index

Language Form Meaning Grammar Note
Stub Culture Indo-European gold-2

MoGr. μάλαμα n. 'gold; object or artifact made of gold' < Gr. μάλαγμα 'soft material'
CDB
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Stub Culture Indo-European gold-1

Gr. χρυσός m. gold'. A Semitic loan, "doubtless through Phoenician" (CDB).
Robert Beekes (with the assistance of Lucien van Beek). "χρῡσός" in: Etymological Dictionary of Greek. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 1, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=10299 >
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Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *leǵ(h)-no-

Lat. lignum n. ‘wood’ < PItal. *legno- < PIE. *leǵ(h)-no-. "If derived from *leg- v. 'to collect', lignum must originally have indicated 'wood collected for firemaking', from the root *leg- v. 'to collect'... Ritter 2004 prefers to derive lignum from *legh- v. 'to lie', as 'stray wood'. " (MDV).
Michiel de Vaan. "lignum" in: Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. De…
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Stub Culture Indo-European wood-1

Gr. ξῠ́λον n. 'wood'. Further etymology uncertain: possibly from a non-IE substrate language (RB).
Robert Beekes (with the assistance of Lucien van Beek). "ξύλον" in: Etymological Dictionary of Greek. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 14, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=7852 >
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Stub Culture Indo-European wood-2

Lat. fustis ‘cut wood, stick baton, club’ < PItal. *fūsti-, *feusti-, *fousti-
Michiel de Vaan. "fūstis" in: Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 18, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=13314 >
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Old Spanish fusta

wood

Automatically transferred. Needs checking
Attested 1428 (COR) Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PGm. *busk- 'bush, small forest (?)'

Fr. bois m. 'wood (material), wood (small forest)' < OFr. bois 'wood (small forest; wood (material)', attested ca. 1100. Of Germanic origin, probably from OFrk. *bŏsk- 'bush', reconstructable from OHG, OS busc, the latter attested in placenames as early as 937, as well as in the compound brâmalbusc 'bramble, blackberry bush' (TLF). There has been some uncertainty concerning the direction of borrowing between Romance and Germanic languages. De Vries thinks Old Norse borrowed from MLat. boscus… Details
Old High German busc, busk

bush

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Old French bosket, bosquet

Did not survive in Picard and therefore cannot be the source of Fr. bosquet. (TLF) Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *kayto- 'wood, field'

PCelt. *kayto- ‘wood’ < PIE. *kayto- 'wood, field'. "The element -cetium found in toponyms such as Anicetis, Leto-cetum, tò ketíon óros (Ptolemy) might reflect a late Gaul. reflex of *kayto-. This is a correspondence limited to Celtic and Germanic. The a-vocalism in these words is difficult to account for. Maybe they were borrowed from some substrate in NW Europe" (RM).
Ranko Matasović. "kayto-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited …
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Stub Culture Indo-European wood-4

OIr. admad
EDIL
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Middle Irish admad

timber; material

Attested in the Middle Irish period. Further etymology uncertain: EDIL states that OIr. admad is the verbal noun of *ad-moin (meaning?). Alternatively, CDB refers to a connection with MIr. maide m. 'post, stick, bundle, wood' < PCelt. *mazdyo- ‘stick’ < PIE. *masdo- (RM), cognate with Lat. mālus, OIc. mastr 'mast'; and also OIr. mátán m. 'club', "which could be from *māzd-ān-o-" (RM). All these Celtic-Italic-Germanic words were "probably borrowed from some pre-IE source" (RM). Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *kʷres- 'bush, thicket'

PCelt. *kʷresno- ‘wood, tree’ < PIE. *kʷres- 'bush, thicket' (IEW: 633) / OIr. crann n. / MW prenn m. (GPC pren) / OBret. pren, MBret. prenn, MoBret. prenn m. / OCo. pren gl. lignum, Co. pren / Gaulish prenne gl. arborem grandem (Endlicher's Glossary / OE hyrst 'bushes'
Ranko Matasović. "kʷresno-" in: Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 15, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/di…
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Stub Culture Indo-European wood-7

CDB Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *medh-ieh₂- 'middle'

PSl. *medjà f. ‘border, boundary, balk’ < BSl. *med-j-o/aʔ < PIE. *medh-ieh₂. Cognates in most IE branches.
CDB
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Stub Culture Indo-European wood-5

1. Arm. geran 'beam, timber'. 2. Alb. verr m. 'alder' < PAlb. *werna. Also Bret. gwern 'alder', W. gwernen 'alder', OIr. fern 'alder' (AED). Arm. gerandi 'scythe, sickle' may be derived from this word, though not everybody thinks so.
Hrach K. Martirosyan. "geran" in: Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 19, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma…
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Stub Culture Indo-European wood-6

Alb. lëndë f. 'wood (material), timber; material' < PAlb. *lentā
AED
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Old Saxon giwirki

work, deed, act

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Middle English busch, busche, busk, buske, bosk, boske

bush; thicket, undergrowth, scrub

Since 1888, OED maintains that the Germanic cognate forms (ON buskr, OHG bush, MDu. busc, bosc) are borrowed from Rom. bosco or LLat. boscum, boscus 'wood', "of which the ulterior source is unknown" (OED). More recently, most sources take the view that the Romance and Late Latin forms are borrowed from Germanic: cf. OFr. bois 'wood (small forest); wood (material)': attested ca. 1100 and said by the dictionary of the Institut de la langue française to be probably borrowed from OFrk. *bŏsk- 'bush… Details
Stub Culture Indo-European PIE. *méh₂-tr- 'mother'

Lat. māteria f. 'material, substance, wood' < māter, mātris f. ‘mother’ < PItal. *mātēr, *mātr- < PIE. *méh₂-tr- 'mother'
Michiel de Vaan. "māter" in: Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. December 14, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=13631 >
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