Lexeme – Details – rooster-6

Lexeme

Transcription
rooster-6
Script
IPA
Meaning
Meaning Note
Grammatical Data
Note
"A group of imitative origin" (CDB): Eng. cock, Fr. coq, PSl. *kokotъ, Skt. kukkuṭa-, etc. Etym. dub.: "Phonetically, it is possible that cocc is < Old Germanic *kukko- , from same root as chicken n.1 (*keukīno- ) viz. *keuk- , kuk- . But its frequent early spelling in Old English with k (kok , kokke , etc., four times out of five in Gregory's Past.) looks rather as if it were considered foreign; for k is rare, except in foreign words. Also its use in one (later mixed) text of the Salic Law, vii. 6 (MSS. of 8–9th cent.), ‘si quis coccum aut gallinam furaverit’ where other MSS. have gallum , and the Malberg glosses have annas , cannas for channas = original Germanic han- , rather favours its being Romanic. In any case, this shows coccus in the Latin of Northern Gaul, a century before the earliest known English instances... Wherever the name arose, it was probably echoic" (OED, 1891).
OED, "A group of imitative origin" (CDB): Eng. cock, Fr. coq, PSl. *kokotъ, Skt. kukkuṭa-, etc. Etym. dub.: "Phonetically, it is possible that cocc is < Old Germanic *kukko- , from same root as chicken n.1 (*keukīno- ) viz. *keuk- , kuk- . But its frequent early spelling in Old English with k (kok , kokke , etc., four times out of five in Gregory's Past.) looks rather as if it were considered foreign; for k is rare, except in foreign words. Also its use in one (later mixed) text of the Salic Law, vii. 6 (MSS. of 8–9th cent.), ‘si quis coccum aut gallinam furaverit’ where other MSS. have gallum , and the Malberg glosses have annas , cannas for channas = original Germanic han- , rather favours its being Romanic. In any case, this shows coccus in the Latin of Northern Gaul, a century before the earliest known English instances... Wherever the name arose, it was probably echoic" (OED, 1891).
CDB, "A group of imitative origin" (CDB): Eng. cock, Fr. coq, PSl. *kokotъ, Skt. kukkuṭa-, etc. Etym. dub.: "Phonetically, it is possible that cocc is < Old Germanic *kukko- , from same root as chicken n.1 (*keukīno- ) viz. *keuk- , kuk- . But its frequent early spelling in Old English with k (kok , kokke , etc., four times out of five in Gregory's Past.) looks rather as if it were considered foreign; for k is rare, except in foreign words. Also its use in one (later mixed) text of the Salic Law, vii. 6 (MSS. of 8–9th cent.), ‘si quis coccum aut gallinam furaverit’ where other MSS. have gallum , and the Malberg glosses have annas , cannas for channas = original Germanic han- , rather favours its being Romanic. In any case, this shows coccus in the Latin of Northern Gaul, a century before the earliest known English instances... Wherever the name arose, it was probably echoic" (OED, 1891).
Rick Derksen. "kokotъ" in: Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. August 30, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl.ludwig.lub.lu.se/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=19098 >, Gr. κίκιρρος m.'rooster'
Robert Beekes (with the assistance of Lucien van Beek). "κίκιρρος" in: Etymological Dictionary of Greek. Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries Online. Edited by Alexander Lubotsky. Brill, 2014. Brill Online. August 31, 2014. < http://iedo.brillonline.nl.ludwig.lub.lu.se/dictionaries/lemma.html?id=6471 >, RD

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Sources

Source
Robert Farren, PIE culture words collection, 2017
[Farren (2017)]
Location
HR1, HS1, HT1, HZ1, IK1

Etymology

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